Juan Uribe Trade To Braves Now A Yes

uribe

Apr 28, 2015; Los Angeles, CA, USA; Los Angeles Dodgers third baseman Juan Uribe (5) looks up for a foul ball in the first inning against the San Francisco Giants at Dodger Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Sports

(Original piece from Fansided, L.A. Sports Hub, May, 2015)

By Dan Gudino

Dodgers third baseman Juan Uribe, after 407 games in Dodger blue will now walk across to the visiting locker room and suit up as an Atlanta Brave.

The Braves finish up a three game series Wednesday at Dodgers Stadium.

Atlanta will send left-hander Eric Stults, who returns to the Dodgers, who drafted him in 2002 and played as a middle reliever the majority of the four seasons in Los Angeles.

Since Andrew Friedman became President of Baseball Operations and Farhan Zaidi became the General Manager of the Dodgers they can’t get enough pitchers into the house.

The Dodgers will get another another Braves lefty in Ian Thomas and right-hander Juan Jaime along third baseman Alberto Callaspo, barring another change of mind, like the commissioner’s office saying no, since the MLB office has the final say.

Callaspo signed with the Braves as a free agent during the off-season and was the one who initially rejected the trade since he had vetoing rights before June 15 per the collective bargaining agreement.

Prior to Tuesday night’s game at Dodgers Stadium between L.A. and Atlanta, reports of the six-man trade that involved both third basemen Uribe and Callaspo was shut down.

Refusing to go was Callaspo, who later gave it deep thought, eventually deciding it was best for him to switch locker rooms.

The Dodgers seem to have the better outcome in the trade, right-hander Chris Withrow, who is recovering from Tommy John’s surgery and is already being said will be sat out till 2016.

Questions of why the Dodgers and Braves would agree to such a deal, where both sides receive aging, hurt, struggling and minor leaguers within the mix bag will rise now.

Juan Uribe lost his starting role to Justin Turner and Alex Guerrero.

Uribe played off the bench as the third man at third base in the depth chart. Stults the once again Dodgers pitcher, lost his spot in the rotation earlier this year with Braves.

Then there’s Juan Jaime, who struggled with ball control and was first demoted to Triple-A, then again demoted to Double-A. So as weird as this trade has been from the beginning, six men have to go.

The choice in players was also hard to understand.

The man in the center of attention, Callaspo, was going to get released possibly later this week anyway, because third baseman Chris Johnson who is recovering from an ankle injury is coming back for his starting job next week.

Callaspo finally got the point that the Braves have parted ways, after second baseman of the Braves, Jace Peterson became the official every-day starter and being scratched from the lineup card Monday and Tuesday.

Callaspo on the Dodgers looks like this — one home run, one for 18 in his last at bats against lefties, and batting a mere .206 with three extra-base hits.

An instant third man on third base, if it even gets to that.

The upcoming days will show whether Callaspo even will get a role in Los Angeles, most likely landing in Rancho Cucamonga, the minor league affiliate of the Dodgers.

Reasons why the Dodgers and Braves created this trade are many but the main reason lies between Dodgers’ current co-owner and team president Stan Kasten and his past relationships with the Braves as their President, between a long 1987 through 2003.

Making favors for old friends could of played a role to Dodgers bidding adios to “Papi” Uribe, or even locker room issues from older veteran players like Callaspo and Uribe would cause for instant change too.

Reasons must remain positive for the Dodgers as they continue their minor league stockpiling of pitchers, as Dodgers GM Zaidi, continues his Moneyball ways, knowing Los Angeles will need pitchers in later innings and hopefully to the Zaidi plan, later in September and deep in October.

 

 

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